Here's where we began....pretty dismal no doubt. I even considered putting a clock in this one and just hanging it on the wall but wheres the fun in that? Its probably worth noting that this is MY instrument so the decisions were easy, no one to ask but myself. The back of this guitar was loose, all braces were pulled away & most of the center reinforcements were gone. The gray substance is most likely JB Weld, notice the "extra" bridge plate....uggghhhhhhh........

    Patched up the mahogany top at the bridge, chiseled off all the JB Weld, glued up all the cracks,braces, strips, splinters, cleats, and made the decision to strip that nasty finish that had been applied with a paint brush and/or roller. 1500 grit sandpaper got the face of the headstock in decent shape, the sweat rolling off one's brow make a great lubricant for wet sanding! About this time I was wondering if this was really gonna be worth it...

    I have come to realize this project may never be completely finished, new keys, new fret job, new bridge, bone saddle & bone nut, neck reset, and a new sunburst finish that still a work in progress...but it sounds amazing! The more I read about these guitars the cooler it gets, seems that all the spruce was going for airplanes in the war effort, thus the mahogany top. No truss rod because again, all metal was going toward the war effort. Last but not least, women probably build this guitar because all the men were off fighting...probably why its help together as good as it did!